Backlash against luxury shoe designer Christian Louboutin has already started. Louboutin recently won a legal battle in Europe that gave him the rights to his blood red soles. The red bottom don had been in court with rival footwear firm Van Haren since 2012 before he won the case.

Laws in the European Union used to prohibit brands from trademarking the common shapes of clothing and accessories. Rival Van Haren cited this law in the court case against Louboutin. Then, on Tuesday, the European Court of Justice (EJC) decided that Christian Louboutin heels are an exception to this rule.

After winning the case, the brand said in a statement, “For 26 years, the red sole has enabled the public to attribute the origin of the shoe to its creator, Christian Louboutin.”

This case will now be referred back to The Hague Court which is expected to confirm the validity of the red sole trademark.”

Louboutin also said that it “warmly welcomes” the case ruling, which will prevent other brands from copying their trademarked “bloody shoes.”

But this victory didn’t go over well with everyone.

According to a French reality star named Jessica Thivenin, Christian Louboutin is working on its brand image in other ways, too.

“The society assigns to us justice, because they consider that the presence of our shoes in the night’s program strongly to its brand image,” Thivenin said on a (since deleted) Snapchat of her holding up a pair of Loubou’s.

Apparently, the brand is asking that their shoes no longer appear on the feet of reality TV stars, and their shows. Based off of Thivenin’s social media clap back, Louboutin doesn’t think it’s good publicity for their image.

“I find it kind of lame. Because it must be someone to carry your pair of shoes ? (…),” Thivenin ranted in another deleted video.

“If you’re not someone famous, that does not have a good image you do not have the right ? (…) It must not be a baker, it is necessary not to work at the factory, it should not be reality tv, it must not do what ?”

Watch the rant here.

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