“PBS for Gen Z, Century of the Self meets Sesame Street, theory as self-help an Art School that you can stream.”

DIS Magazine has been a lot of things since its 2010 inception — magazine, art collective, concept store, tongue-in-cheek blender of high and low culture, curator of Kim Kardashian lookalikes — and it’s now one more thing: a video channel.

Artnet reports that DIS, the post-internet art collective, is (like seemingly every other media institution right now) is pivoting to video. In January 2018, DIS will be transitioning to a video-streaming channel its staff describes as “PBS for Gen Z, Century of the Self meets Sesame Street, theory as self-help an Art School that you can stream.”

The collective firmly believes that video is the future. “The signs are everywhere,” DIS wrote in an email to Artnet News. “Internet video streaming through services like Roku, Apple TV, or Chromecast grew 50 percent in 2016. Podcast ad revenue went up 85 percent since last year. Learning channels (MOOCS) like Khan Academy and Coursera are growing in huge numbers, indicating we want more information, we just want it delivered differently.”

I’m admittedly a bit sad to learn their text edition is disappearing — I think there’s a certain sort of nuanced voice that’s lost when video is relied on in lieu of words. But if there’s any outlet that’s going to do something weird and new with video, it’s probably DIS. Videos on the site are a blend of PBS-like educational material, surreal sketch comedy, and art. A few videos that will stream are artist Aria Dean talking about her theory of blackness within meme culture, a segment where a reporter asks people on the street “What is an egg?”, and a report on the Seasteading movement.

New videos will premiere at San Francisco’s de Young museum in a show called “Genre-Noncomforming: The DIS Edutainment Network” opening December 3.

(h/t Artnet)

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