Globetrotter, chef, and TV personality Anthony Bourdain, 61, is dead after an apparent suicide on Friday morning.

It was announced that the “Parts Unknown” host passed away in his hotel room in Strasbourg, France, while on location filming an episode of the CNN show.

CNN confirmed Bourdain’s death on Twitter this morning, saying, “It is with extraordinary sadness we can confirm the death of our friend and colleague, Anthony Bourdain. [sic] His talents never ceased to amaze us and we will miss him very much.”

According to the New York Times, a spokeswoman from the United States Embassy in Paris confirmed Bourdain’s passing, saying, “We extend our sincere condolences to friends and family. We stand ready to provide appropriate consular services. Out of respect for the family, we have no further comment.”

The New York-based rebel started his career as a line cook, before the New Yorker published an exposé on the restaurant industry penned by Bourdain. The story sparked a written series exposing the “underbelly” of kitchens called “Kitchen Confidential,” as well as his countless appearances on television.

Something must be in the water. Bourdain joins fashion designer and fellow New Yorker Kate Spade, who also committed suicide this week in her Upper East Side apartment.

Both of their deaths have been mourned many times over on social media, with people expressing their extreme sadness for the loss of these two great trailblazers.

Stay Wild, AB. @anthonybourdain RIP, Chef. 🍻🍻 the Original rockstar Chef,” wrote foodie blog Unlockt on an Instagram post dedicated to Bourdain.

Bon Appétit shared the following snippet of an article that Bourdain had penned for the magazine in 2012 about the lessons his father taught him about food and happiness:

He taught me early that the value of a dish is the pleasure it brings you; where you are sitting when you eat it—and who you are eating it with—are what really matter. Perhaps the most important life lesson he passed on was: Don’t be a snob. It’s something I will always at least aspire to—something that has allowed me to travel this world and eat all it has to offer without fear or prejudice. To experience joy, my father taught me, one has to leave oneself open to it.”

We’re devastated to share that Anthony Bourdain has died at age 61. His influence and mark on the food, travel, and journalism community was extraordinary, inspiring a generation of writers, cooks, and explorers. In 2012, he wrote a piece for Bon Appétit about his childhood, his memories of his father, and raising his own daughter. We're re-sharing his words (and photos) today. "He taught me early that the value of a dish is the pleasure it brings you; where you are sitting when you eat it—and who you are eating it with—are what really matter. Perhaps the most important life lesson he passed on was: Don't be a snob. It's something I will always at least aspire to—something that has allowed me to travel this world and eat all it has to offer without fear or prejudice. To experience joy, my father taught me, one has to leave oneself open to it." The full essay is through the link in our profile. ——————————————————————— If you are having thoughts of suicide, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, at 1-800-273-talk (8255), or the Suicide Crisis Line, at 1-800-784-2433, or text 741741.

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[If you are having thoughts of suicide, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 (TALK) or go to SpeakingOfSuicide.com/resources for a list of additional resources. Here’s what you can do when a loved one is severely depressed.]

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